One Killed, One Injured in San Diego Motorcycle Accident

One person died and another was critically injured in a motorcycle crash in Rancho Santa Fe, according to NBC News 7 in San Diego. According to reports from the California Highway Patrol (CHP), William Jimenez, 58, and an unidentified 49-year-old female passenger were traveling northbound on Via De Fontuna on July 21 when the accident occurred around 10:30 p.m.

Jimenez and the passenger were riding on a three-wheeled Harley Davidson when Jimenez lost control and ran off the road, striking trees and a fence. It was unknown how fast the motorcycle was traveling or why Jimenez lost control. Responders pronounced the female passenger dead on the scene and Jimenez was rushed to Scripps La Jolla Hospital, where he was treated for serious injuries. Investigators suspect that alcohol may have played a factor in the accident.

When riders lose control and veer off a paved road, it becomes nearly impossible to dodge hazards like trees and fences. According to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were 3,615 motorcycle fatalities in the US in 2010, which is down from 4,462 in 2009 and 5,312 in 2008. It is great that the numbers are decreasing. All motorcyclists should take a safety course at least once a year to refresh safety skills. Please visit our website for more information on motorcycle accidents, and if you or a loved one has been in a motorcycle accident, call today.

Dudek Law Firm, APC—San Diego wrongful death attorney.



One Response to One Killed, One Injured in San Diego Motorcycle Accident

  1. You are correct that bikers should take a refresher safety course every year or so to brush up on accident avoidance skills. Bikers should also be very careful with alcohol. Riding intoxicated is different than driving a car after a few drinks. While we highly discourage both, bikers who drink are more likely to cause an accident because alcohol disrupts balance – a major factor in safe motorcycling. Bikers are also 32 times more likely to sustain fatal injuries in an accident than an automobile driver or passenger per mile traveled, according to NHTSA.